The media considers to be a sharp weapon for revolution06:03

Published on March 21, 2015

In the space of 60 years, the media considers to be a sharp weapon for active contribution to the revolution and the struggle for victory

Introduction: In the space of 60 years, the Lao media industry has developed continuously. To celebrate the 60th anniversary of the establishment of the LPRP which falls on March 22nd, we proudly present the special report on the media was considered to be a sharp weapon for active contribution to the revolution and the struggle for victory.

Story: In the space of 60 years the print media in Laos has swelled from the single Neo Lao Issara newspaper published in 1955 to the more than 100 newspapers and magazines available today.

The media industry has developed continuously, with personnel, print and electronic media and infrastructure all enjoying growth under the leadership and direction of the Party during the various periods of the country’s development.

The media was considered to be a sharp weapon for active contribution to the revolution and the struggle for victory. In the Resolution, Party Politburo Committee members described their media outlet as a revolutionary newspaper that was born of the people’s fighting movement and developed alongside the victories of the revolution. The media became an important instrument connecting the Party and the people.

The media delivered the ideologies, revolutionary theories and policy directions of the Party to the people and in turn conveyed the ideas, concepts and wishes of the people to the Party.

The Resolution also said that after the fourth and fifth Party Congresses, the Party’s media outlets had a leading role in translating the renovation policy and visions of the Party.

The role of the media was also to provide new knowledge and model plans of work for the Lao people and others living in Laos.

The Party has focused on human resource development in the media and its associated infrastructure. It oversaw the creation of the Cultural and Mass Media Institute under the Ministry of Information, Culture and Tourism. Ten years ago, the National University of Laos opened a mass media section to teach journalism. Approved by the National Assembly in 2008, the Law on Media is a valuable tool of guidance for media outlets.

Over the past 60 years, under Party leadership Laos has developed more than 100 different newspapers published daily, weekly and monthly, as well as magazines, journals and news bulletins.

These serve the six million citizens of Laos as well as readers in foreign countries. These publications are written in Lao, English and French.

In addition, Lao National Television has more than 30 television stations and broadcasts on Channel 1 and Channel 3.

Lao National Television broadcasts news, entertainment, documentaries and short films in Lao, as well as news programmes in French and English and the Hmong and Khmu languages. The government also allows Lao nationals to operate private television stations. Lao Star, TV Lao and MV Lao are all privately owned.

Laos also set up a cable television company in 2002, which broadcasts more than 40 programmes. In 2007 another wireless television company came into operation.

The Internet officially became available in 1996 and is managed by the Lao Network Internet Committee.

Now the national gateway connects to the outside world and the Lao national domain is located at the Ministry of Post and Telecommunication. There are six Internet service providers, with the number of users increasing rapidly.

Websites in Lao and foreign languages have increased in number and Internet cafes are plentiful in Vientiane and the provinces.

The broadcasting media plays an important role in promoting the cause of social and economic development. There are now 43 radio stations nationwide.

A large number of people living in urban and rural areas, as well as Lao people living in several other countries, are able to receive news and listen to radio programmes. They can also watch Lao television on several channels, learning useful information from programme presenters.

All this is testimony to the Party’s supportive leadership over the past 60 years. The media industry has grown alongside other areas of development and continues to evolve and expand.

Source: Lao National Television News in English
Broadcast on March 18, 2015